Dr. Arthur works to get FDA approval on a new product to prevent strokes

Dr. Adam Arthur is on a mission to get FDA approval for a new procedure that can prevent stroke-causing ruptures in the brain. 

“In Memphis, we are right in the middle of what we call the stroke belt,” Arthur said. “I really think it’s great we are doing things to reduce the risk and morbidity of patients who are at risk of stroke.”  

In 2018, Arthur was beginning a clinical trial of a new product so AVF patients can potentially have a way of stopping a leak before it causes a stroke - AVFs are found in the dura mater around the brain. The new product is called PHIL Liquid Embolic System, or PHIL for short, which stands for Precipitating Hydrophobic Injectable Liquid. The substance was invented in California by Microvention-Terumo Inc. and has been tested at the Medical Education & Research Institute (MERI), across the street from Methodist University Hospital. 

Instead of cranial surgery, PHIL is a paste-like substance that can block or close the AVF using catheterization, or a long thin tube that is inserted in a vein and threaded through to the affected blood vessel. The products on the market today require surgeons to mix the vessel-filling paste with iodine, which can leak out over time creating an artifact, or shine, on future CT scans and MRI images. Iodine is bonded onto the chemical backbone used in PHIL, so it is less likely to leak and visible to the surgeon at the time of injection using X-ray guidance.

The first patient in Tenessee received the new procedure in December 2018. Dr. Arthur is hopeful that this new product will receive FDA approval in the coming years.

This is a summary from The Daily Memphian. Read the full article here.